Quick Posture Tips

 "Slump freely, often, feeling no guilt!” -SH


Quick Tips to Great Posture:

  • Appreciate slumping! Keep a thoracic curve, so the heart and lungs hang freely.
  • To sit erect in a chair without stiffening: Knees wider, relax belly, walk sitting bones behind, breathe to the back not front, shoulders down and back, tongue and head back, chair is high enough, flat bottomed chair, abdominal breathing.
  • Abdominal breathing without collapsing the chest – Practice often! Hand on chest, hand on belly. Upper hand doesn’t move.
  • Use mainly flat-bottomed, flat backed chairs that are tall enough for your body, with minimal cushioning.
  • Walk sitting bones behind every time you sit in a chair, and then rock from the hips.
  • Rock and move from the floor of the pelvis, spine straight – wake up, move that area.
  • Spread arms out to sides, pull shoulders behind: open out. Do many variations as often as you can. Crucial!
  • Avoid lumbar supports, bucket seats, armrests, curved in chairs and swivel chairs: they immobilize our body.
  • To correct Head Forward Posture: counter-rotation of head and shoulders, learn against the wall, One or both hands clasped behind head, roll tongue up and back. Abdominal breathing.  Do not pull shoulders back.
  • Pretend being attached by a swordsman. Defend. Quickest way to good posture.
  • Suspend tailbone, move spine like snake.
  • Rock the pelvis independently of stiffening the chest and back.
  • Sense and move independently the floor of the pelvis.
  • Slump freely, often, feeling no guilt. Sleep in flexion! Imitate teenagers and toddlers.
  • Look down with the eyes, don’t tilt head.
  • Napkin or handkerchief on top of head.
  • Roll tongue up and back, push head back.
  • Avoid soft beds, too soft and form-fitted chairs: they immobilize movement, tight muscles become chronic.
  • Breathe into the chest and hold the breath there. Stretch.
  • As you exhale expand the chest. This prevents collapsed upper chest. Do this ten times a day.
© Copyright 2015 Steve Hamlin  www.mybodycanlearn.com